Using the Federal Rules of Evidence’s Rules Regarding Expert Testimony to Demand a Higher Standard for Effective Assistance of Counsel

By: Samuel Goldsmith The constitutional standard for ineffective assistance of counsel is too strict. In setting the standard, the Supreme Court in Strickland v. Washington hoped to keep courts from meddling in attorneys’ strategic decisions. In the process, the Court went too far. Defendants have felt the brunt of criminal punishment despite having been represented…

Economics and Intolerance, Painted with a Crude Brush

By: Henry Rouse Every day, the people of the United States bear fresh witness to our society’s continuing intolerance. Experience tells us that the problem is intractable and multifaceted. Reason tells us that an all-out effort to fix the situation requires examining it from all angles. Economics, abstract and cold though it may seem, provides…

Lack of Understanding Leads to Confusion and Hostility toward Protestors of Police Violence

By: Paul Filippelli A 2013 study by the Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) estimated that White Americans’ social networks are 91% White while Black Americans’ are 83% Black and Hispanic Americans’ are 64% Hispanic.  Alarmingly, only 1% of people with whom White Americans said they “discussed important matters” in the last six months were Black.  http://publicreligion.org/research/2014/08/analysis-social-network/…

The Moynihan Report: 50 Years Later

The Georgetown Journal of Law and Modern Critical Race Perspectives is excited to announce its 2015 Symposium, “The Moynihan Report: 50 Years Later.” The event will be held at Georgetown’s Law Center (600 New Jersey Ave. NW, Washington, DC) in the Gewirz Student Center on the 12th floor from 10am-4pm.  Breakfast and lunch will be provided.  The Symposium…

Racial Identification in Modern Day Mexico

By: Henry Rouse Mexico’s government has recently taken steps toward, for the first time on one of their modern censuses, asking citizens whether they identify as black (or “jarocho,” “costeño,” or “moreno,” terms common in Mexico). This month, the government conducted a survey of about 5,000 households, asking about preferred terms and African descent. Next…